VA Finalizes Presumptive Service Connection for Camp Lejeune Veterans. Learn more.

  • I AM A DISABLED VETERAN; AM I ELIGIBLE FOR DISABILITY BENEFITS?

    You may be entitled to service connection and compensation if you have (1) an in-service disability, injury, or incident, (2) a current disability, and (3) a medical connection between the current disability and the in-service disability, injury or incident. VA also recognizes that certain diseases or disabilities may be presumed to be related to military service even if not treated and/or diagnosed while on active duty. To learn more about the VA disability claims process, Download our Tip Guide for Veterans here.

  • WHAT WILL MY APPEAL COST?

    There is no charge to the veteran to hire CCK to appeal a Board decision to CAVC. If we prevail at Court, the government will pay our legal fees. The only cost the veteran is responsible for is the Court's $50 filing fee, which can be waived if that presents a financial hardship.

  • WHAT CAN I DO TO MAKE THE PROCESS GO FASTER?

    Unfortunately the VA is experiencing a severe backlog, and the process can be very slow for veterans. The best thing you can do to avoid delays is to respond quickly and completely to VA's requests for information or documentation.

  • WHAT IS A NOTICE OF DISAGREEMENT (NOD)?

    If you disagree with VA rating decision, you or your VA-accredited representative can file a written statement with the VA regional office to appeal the decision. This statement is called a Notice of Disagreement (NOD). You must file your NOD within one year of the date your local regional office mailed its decision in order to maintain your right to appeal.

  • WHAT IS A DECISION REVIEW OFFICER (DRO)?

    A Decision Review Officer (DRO) is a senior-level claims representative who has the authority to grant disability claims that were denied, and cannot overrule any prior grant of benefits. The DRO can conduct a hearing and is not bound by the determination(s) in the initial decision.

  • WHAT IS A STATEMENT OF THE CASE (SOC)?

    After a VA regional office receives your Notice of Disagreement (NOD), it is required to issue a Statement of the Case (SOC). This is a detailed explanation of the evidence, laws, and regulations used by the VA regional office in deciding your claim. The SOC will be mailed to you or your VA-accredited representative along with a VA Form 9.

  • WHAT IS A SUPPLEMENTAL STATEMENT OF THE CASE (SSOC)?

    An SSOC, is a document prepared by the Veteran's local regional office to inform the Veteran of any changes, or addition to, the information included in the Statement of the Case or any prior Supplemental Statement of the Case.

  • WHAT IS A VA FORM 9?

    A VA Form 9 is used in the last step of the appeals process. You or your VA-accredited claims agent will receive this form along with your Statement of the Case (SOC). It must be completed and returned to your VA regional office stating the benefits you want, identifying any mistakes found in the SOC, and expressing your desire to appeal the claim to the Board of Veterans' Appeals (BVA) in Washington, D.C. This form also allows you to request a personal hearing before a Board of Veterans' Appeals (BVA) member. If you wish to appeal the rating decision, the regional office must receive your VA Form 9 either within 30 days of the date that your SSOC was mailed to you or 60 days from the date the SOC was mailed to you. If it has been less than one year since the mailing date of the rating decision, you have the remainder of that one year period, whichever is longer.

  • WHAT IS THE BOARD OF VETERANS’ APPEALS (BVA), OR BOARD?

    The Board is the appellate body of the United States Department of Veterans' Affairs, located in Washington, D.C. The Board will make the final determination on a veteran's appeal de novo, meaning it is not bound by what happened at the regional office.

  • WHAT IS A REMAND?

    A remand from the Board is an order sending your claim back to the regional office for further action. A remand is not a final decision. The Board may remand your claim if it finds more information is needed to make a decision, or if there is a procedural step that has not been completed.

  • I RECEIVED AN UNFAVORABLE BOARD DECISION; WHAT SHOULD I DO?

    Please contact our office as soon as possible to see if we can help you appeal your decision. You have 120 days from the date on the decision to file an appeal. Our attorneys are experienced in appealing Board decisions to the United States Court of Appeals for Veterans' Claims (CAVC).

  • WHAT IS THE CAVC?

    CAVC, also frequently called the Veterans Court, has exclusive jurisdiction to review decisions of the Board of Veterans' Appeals. Although the CAVC is located in Washington, D.C., it handles cases from all over the country and neither you nor your attorney need to be in Washington due to the Court's electronic filing system.

  • WHAT IS THE PROCESS IN A CAVC APPEAL?

    First, our attorneys will thoroughly review your VA claims folder. Next, we will participate in a telephone conference with the VA attorney, moderated by member of the Court's Central Legal Staff. If the issues in your case are not resolved at this conference, we will proceed to briefing. After the briefs have been filed, your case will be assigned to a CAVC judge who will render a decision.